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Edition1

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Dear culinary enthusiasts, defenders of good taste and connoisseurs of good food. 

As old as mankind itself, preparing food and taking in nourishment are two of our basic human needs. With the passing of time, our relationship with cooking and eating has continually evolved – ultimately changing beyond all recognition to reflect the social and cultural context in which we live.

Inevitably enough, this evolution has transformed what we want from our kitchens and everything in them. As a platform for cooking in company and taste-testing new things, the kitchen needs to be multifunctional and practical – and it needs to look good. What we need is space – and room for new ideas. In giving birth to a new generation of the kitchen sink, the Prepstation, we’ve created a multifunctional space to meet today’s needs. So we invited a selection of food bloggers to come over and try it out – giving them free rein to go wild with their creativity, fresh inspiration and delicious recipe ideas. The results are presented for your delectation on these pages.

 Like everything in this magazine, the recipes have been specially chosen to whet your appetite – for cooking, for experimenting, for improvising and for indulging with friends and loved ones. Opening up wonderful opportunities for you to make every day anything but ordinary. And evince that same spirit which is constantly driving, motivating and inspiring us here at SCHOCK: Never ordinary. Every day.

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Clean eating, high end burgers or home made basics: for all their diversity and individuality, the latest food trends have much in common – quality fresh foods in balanced quantities, for example. Read on to find out how it all fits together with fast food, and how a couple of globetrotters discovered the regional specialty ‘ceviche’ – and learn more about other fascinating food trends of the year.

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Meet Salt & Silver, a.k.a. Cozy and Jo, a.k.a. surfers, book publishers, film makers, caterers, dropouts, bloggers, gourmets, entertainers, entrepreneurs, chefs and foodies. On their website at the two Hamburg boys not only give us a glimpse of the big wide world as they’ve seen it, they also show us what happens when you quit your job and go off in search of the best waves, stories and recipes. They’ve captured them in adventure-surf cookbooks and documentary videos, organised pop up restaurants and events, made a documentary about the surf scene in Cuba, created a special agave spirit, developed a brand new catering concept and are about to open their very own restaurant in Hamburg. But really, they’re just two nice guys doing whatever they want. No ifs, no buts, and plenty of passion. www.saltandsilver.net

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How to make the world (and gourmet cuisine) a better place just by reading a newspaper? What eating meat has to do with a responsible and healthy lifestyle? And how people in fine dining circles and amateur chefs alike can easily start enjoying the taste of buffalo meat? Answers to these and other questions are offered by Manuel, Bastian and Martin from Büffel Bill on their website at büffelbill.com and in our interview – and it’s all impressively sustainable, involving a genuine culinary discovery, and one that meets the highest standards and satisfies contemporary tastes, too.

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I read in the newspaper that there are half a million water buffalos living in Italy for the production of buffalo mozzarella and that the male calves are simply disposed of as soon as they are born. Thrown in the river, chucked in a container, wherever – and we wanted to change that.

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No doubt about it: A plant-based diet without the use of any animal products makes ethical and ecological sense and is creative and popular to boot. But many people still think of it as both dull and difficult to pull off. Hardly anyone ever associates lasagne and cheesecake with ‘vegan’ – never mind sugar and chasseur sausage. But all that will change. Because as Berliners Julia and Isa of Zucker & Jagdwurst, which translates as Sugar & Chasseur Sausage, demonstrate on their blog at www.zuckerundjagdwurst.com and on our Prepstation, it makes no odds whether a recipe is vegan or not as they show us just what it is that makes good food good. Like the wonderfully comforting feeling of sitting down at the table with good friends and looking forward to an oven-fresh cheesecake to chase down your lasagne.

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Farewell to all the glocal adventurers, buffalo fans and vegan dessert devotees out there. We trust it wasn’t only us who had a lot of fun with this first edition of our magazine. It may have come to an end, but we’ll be back. And in the meantime we’ll keep on working flat out with new ideas so that we’re able to present things that are never ordinary – every day. The SCHOCK Magazine is just one of many formats that bring our marketing claim to life. Another is our new showroom, built out of 12 well travelled shipping containers and offering a home for brand values like community, creativity and pioneering spirit alongside our brightly coloured product range.

 This is the perfect place for us to go on working to generate new inspiration – like by staging special cooking events and delighting our guests. Click onto our website at www.schock.de/magazin or our Facebook page, SCHOCK Germany, for regular updates, a look behind the scenes at the making of the magazine, all the recipes with loads of extra goodies, and everything you could ever want to know about the articles, interviewees and the whole colourful world of SCHOCK. We’re looking forward to seeing you again – and to writing a new chapter full of surprising and inspiring pages.

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Once upon a time there was a small workspace quite cut off from the living quarters: the kitchen. It had a door behind which mysterious things took place. Hardly another soul, aside from the lady of the house, knew exactly what went on in there. Basic foodstuffs from a limited assortment went in, and mostly came out as simple ‘meat and potatoes’ meals. Like its close relative, the laundry room, this was a place dedicated to the household chores. The sink was for doing the washing up and the cooking was all about making meals that filled you up.

 The room barely saw a visitor. Depending on their importance, guests were taken either to the best parlour or the separate dining room. And there they would wait until the eagerly anticipated words ‘Dinner is served’ rang out.

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The workspace of yesteryear has come a long way over the past six decades and is now the heart of the home. No longer is it merely a production space; it is a place for experimentation, creation and celebration. The kitchen has been opened up, architecturally and socially, offering room for everyone and space for ideas, inspiration and indulgence. The furnishing of food by the lady of the house has given way to the fabrication of fun for family and friends.

As the importance of the kitchen has moved up a notch, so too have our ambitions for how our kitchens should be fitted out: with more high-tech appliances and time-saving automation on the one hand, and more options for hand-made creativity and preparing fresh and varied meals on the other. The kitchen has evolved into a multifunctional space – and the sink has turned from a place to do the dishes into a versatile all-rounder whose smart solutions cut down the distances to be travelled in the kitchen and ramp up the possibilities to be had.

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Everybody’s talking about clean eating – and by ‘clean’ they’re not referring to kitchen hygiene. They’re talking about avoiding additives and industrial production methods that denature our food. As American clean eating pioneer Michael Pollan explains, we shouldn’t be buying anything that comes in packaging plastered with unfamiliar words, or anything our grandmothers wouldn’t recognise as food – like cheese in a tube. Instead, we should opt for natural, quality foods that are freshly prepared and have a clean record ecologically and ethically speaking.

  The goal is to aim for the conscious, sustainable enjoyment of real food free from any added chemicals, sugar, flavour enhancers, white flour, artificial flavourings or other additives. A clean eater’s diet can incorporate seasonal vegetables, whole grains, fruits, nuts, vegetable fats, super foods and lean meat like chicken or buffalo from organic farms with high animal welfare standards. The clean eating trend has taken off to the extent that there are now many different versions of it, including gluten free, lactose free, vegetarian, vegan and even one for a raw food diet. The one thing they all have in common is a focus on enjoying healthy, unadulterated food.

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What shall it be – fast food or high end? Grab a quick bite or enjoy top-notch culinary creations? This trend removes the either/or from the equation. And serves up classic fast food like burgers, sandwiches and pizza with an exclusive premium angle, which has nothing in common with stodgy burger buns, greasy ready-made sauces and overcooked French fries. Restaurants that purvey high end fast food often have a very select menu, every dish being prepared with great attention to detail, turning quality fresh ingredients into perfect cuisine. In so doing they not only cater to the tastes of the discerning connoisseur but also have their finger on the pulse of time, knowing that cooking or eating for hours is not always an option. Whether you opt for buffalo burgers or truffle pizza, with high end fast food you know for sure that your taste buds will tell you it’s right – in next to no time.

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Like your food exotic but want to keep it regional at the same time? Well, you can do just that with glocal food – a portmanteau of global and local. It’s perfect for those who love eating and love travelling – combining the two outlooks into an attitude shaped by curiosity, openness and a love of experimentation. And passion for authentic, regional dishes – wherever you may be in the world. Unlike local cuisine, which is mostly enjoyed at home as an homage to the weekly market and the local region, glocal gourmets scour the globe – wherever they happen to be – for typical recipes and ways of prepping food that are just crying out to be discovered, sampled and shared. The trend has nothing in common with the usual tourist haunts and their picture-book menus and everything to do with culinary eye-openers, things that represent the country and its people just as much as their kitchens and cultures do, or their regional variations and traditions. The outcome of this quest for global-local clues is a surprise every time. But it always opens up a brand new world for anyone who likes to look beyond the horizon in what they cook and eat.

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As a purely plant-based diet, veganism is certainly one of the biggest food movements of our time. And it’s also very popular now to serve a modern take on good plain cooking like the classic German meatballs in caper sauce or the good old hotpot. The new classic trend sees even filter coffee and old-style corner shops that sell their groceries loose making a comeback on our city streets and in many restaurant kitchens.

New classic vegan blends this feeling of wanting to get back to basics in the food we eat, moving away from haute cuisine and towards good honest food, with the desire for a diet that dispenses with all animal products. It’s a bit like coming home but breaking new ground at the same time. Goulash with dumplings? Potato soup with sausages? And sugared pancakes with raisins for dessert? Yes, please! But it needs to be creatively interpreted and it’s got to be plant based – and it has to have what it takes to one day become a classic.

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You are what you eat. But what exactly is in what we eat? More and more people are interested in where their food comes from and what conditions it is produced in. The easiest way to know for sure is to switch from the role of consumer to producer and make your own food. Devotees of the home made trend are no longer restricting themselves to potting jam and baking cakes: people are turning the tomatoes from their own vegetable patch into ketchup, pickling their own cucumbers, drying their fruit in dehydrators and adding it to their morning muesli, buying pieces of fresh meat and turning it into mincemeat themselves. People in ever-greater numbers are even brewing their own beer – and teaming it with a home-baked sourdough roll spread with a bit of herb butter made with the leaves of the home-grown plant on the windowsill for the perfect DIY snack. Try it yourself and you’ll find that it not only fills your stomach, but also fills you with pride.

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Patties (per burger)
200g buffalo mince
pinch of salt and pepper
1 tsp. Dijon mustard (mild)
1 tbsp. melted butter

Buns (enough for 9-10 buns)
200ml water (warm)
4 tbsp. milk
1 yeast cube (fresh)
35g sugar
8g salt
80g butter (softened)
500g flour
2 eggs

Sauce and toppings
3 slices of cheddar cheese
1 slice of tomato
½ a small onion
a bit of lamb’s lettuce
1 pickled gherkin
white balsamic vinegar
ketchup
mayonnaise
brown sugar
balsamic vinegar

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BUNS

To make the dough, crumble the yeast into a bowl with the warm water, milk and sugar and leave to stand for 5 minutes. Then add the flour, salt, 1 egg and butter and knead it together. Cover and leave the dough in a warm place for about an hour.

Separate the dough into approx. 100g pieces and form each one into a round ball in your hands. Place each dough ball in a stainless steel ring on a baking tray and let them rise for another hour. In the meantime, whisk 1 egg with 2 tbsp. water and 2 tbsp. milk. After the buns have risen you can coat them with this mixture and sprinkle them with sesame seeds to taste. Bake the buns in a pre-heated oven at 200°C (top/bottom heat) for about 15 minutes until they are slightly golden but not too dark.

PATTIES & TOPPING

Put your fresh buffalo rib-eye steaks through a meat mincer (or use ready-minced buffalo meat instead). Place the minced meat in a bowl and combine with the Dijon mustard, melted butter and a little salt and pepper. Then form into patties about 2.5cm thick, salt them generously on both sides and let them stand for one hour. Fry the patties on the highest heat or grill them until a crust has formed. After turning them over, add the cheddar cheese.

As soon as both sides have a nice crust, leave the patties in the oven at 100°C for about 5 minutes until the cheese has melted. Meanwhile, fry the onion rings, season with salt and let them simmer for 30 minutes on a low heat with a little butter. Then glaze them with dark balsamic vinegar, add brown sugar and caramelise on a high heat for 1-2 minutes, stirring constantly. For the sauce, finely chop the pickled gherkin and combine with ketchup, mayonnaise, brown sugar, white balsamic vinegar and a little of the gherkin liquid (from the jar) and serve it all in the buns as a premium burger. Tasty!

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Serves 3-4:

Zutaten

Sticky rice with coconut milk
 
4 tbsp. sugar
½ tsp. salt
400ml coconut milk
100ml water

Fruity nigiri

Sticky rice with coconut milk
Fresh fruit
150g desiccated coconut

Preparation

Wash the sticky rice and bring to the boil together with the coconut milk and water. Add the sugar and salt. Bring everything to the boil and let it simmer over a low flame, stirring constantly. After 15 minutes, keep testing the sticky rice to see whether it's cooked. If there is not enough liquid in the pot, simply pour in a little hot water (no more than 200ml in total). After 20-25 minutes the rice should be done. It should be soft but still slightly al dente. Tip the rice into a sieve and place over a bowl to drain. Stir vigorously to allow the heat to escape and the rice to cool down more quickly.

Now it's time to wash, pit and finely chop the fruit as necessary. Cut small triangles, squares or strips out of all the fruits. Try to make the pieces as fine as possible. It's best to use a very sharp knife. Once the rice has cooled you can form it into nigiri shapes. Always moisten your hands with water. Spread the coconut flakes out on a flat plate. Roll the nigiri in the coconut flakes, coating them completely before arranging them on a large plate. Now decorate with the fine fruit slices.

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Ingredients

Chocolate crêpes

150g flour
1 tbsp. baking powder
3 tbsp. baking powder
4 tbsp. sugar
300 ml soya milk
3 tbsp. vegetable margarine (for frying)

Sticky rice with coconut milk
Chocolate crêpes
Fresh fruits

Preparation
Combine the flour, baking powder, cocoa powder and sugar and stir in 300 ml soya milk until a smooth consistency is obtained. Heat the vegetable margarine in a flat crêpe pan and fry the crêpes, turning them once before letting them cool on a piece of kitchen towel when done.


Take the fresh fruit and wash, peel and pit it as necessary. Cut the fruit into long strips. Now lay a sushi mat on the table and cover it with cling film. Place a crêpe on top of the cling film. Spread about 2 tbsp. of the sticky rice with coconut milk evenly over the crêpe with your fingers. Since the rice is very sticky, this may take a while. It helps to keep moistening your hands with cold water. Now place the fruit in a line from left to right across the sticky rice. With the help of the sushi mat, gradually roll the crêpe together. Keep pressing firmly so that the resulting maki roll does not loosen too much. As soon as you've rolled it up, place on a firm surface and cut into several makis (4-5) with a sharp knife.

Top tip: Spread some caramel dip on top with a teaspoon in quick motions.

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Chocolate soy sauce
200 g dark cooking chocolate
2 tsp. coconut oil

Heat the ingredients in a bain marie. As soon as the chocolate coating is completely melted, pour it into a small bowl and serve immediately.


Caramel dip
40ml coconut milk
40g coconut sugar
salt

Mix all the ingredients together in a pan, quickly bring to the boil and simmer for five minutes, stirring all the time. The cooled dip is delicious with fruity nigiri and maki rolls.


Pear gari
1 pear ca.
500ml water

½ a lemon
3 tbsp. preserving sugar
pulp of 1 vanilla pod or 2 cloves

Take the pear and wash, peel and cut it into very long, thin strips that look a bit like traditional pickled ginger. Put it in a pan, cover with water and heat it up. Add the juice of ½ a lemon, followed by 3 tbsp. preserving sugar. Add the pulp of 1 vanilla pod or 2 cloves and simmer for 7-8 minutes until the pear is soft.


Matcha wasabi
100g vegan cream cheese
1 tsp. matcha green tea powder

Mix the ingredients together. Stir in the agave syrup to taste. Then set aside in a cool place. To serve, place the matcha wasabi in a plastic bag and cut off one corner to use it like a piping bag and pipe the wasabi onto the plates.

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Serves two:
½ a red onion
½ a papaya
½ a chilli pepper
1 bunch of coriander
500g fillet of sea bream (sushi quality)
juice of 3-4 limes
seeds of ½ a pomegranate
sea salt
freshly milled black pepper

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First peel off the outer two or three layers of the onion and slice the rest thinly. Then peel the papaya and cut the pulp into cubes of about 1x1cm. Then chop up the coriander and the deseeded chilli pepper. Wash and dry the sea bream, bone it and cut it into cubes of about 1x1cm. Squeeze the limes and put the juice in a large bowl with the fresh fish – the acid will then ‘cook’ the raw fish.

All that’s left to do is combine the onions, papaya, coriander, chilli and pomegranate seeds with the fish, season to taste and let the fresh fish concoction give you a real kick!

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